What is PRK Surgery?

Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a type of refractive surgery. This kind of surgery uses a laser to treat vision problems caused by refractive errors. You have a refractive error when your eye does not refract (bend) light properly.

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Dr. Baseer Khan, MD, FRCS(C), P.CEO, Ophthalmologist, discusses PRK surgery as an option for some patients who want to eliminate the need for glasses.

Dr. Baseer Khan, MD, FRCS(C), P.CEO, Ophthalmologist, discusses the different types of refractive laser eye surgery to correct vision.

PRK Surgery for Vision Correction

PRK is a laser surgery that’s designed to remove the need for glasses. It has a long history and is the oldest form of laser eye surgery. It involves removing the endothelium, or the surface of the skin of the eye, and then the cornea is then reshaped by using an excimer laser. An excimer causes the cornea to be reshaped, causing a change in the refraction and the power of the eye, thereby eliminating glasses.

After PRK, because the epithelium, or the skin of the eye, has been removed, a bandage contact lens needs to be placed on the eye. Otherwise, a patient will be in extreme pain. Often drops are required for at least a few weeks, and patients can remove a bandaged contact lens after a week. But it will take about 6-8 weeks for their vision to be completely optimized after the surgery.

PRK is often done for patients who aren’t candidates for SMILE and LASIK, because it is an effective procedure, but because of the pain and discomfort associated with it, the other procedures that we have available to us now are often preferred treatments.

The side effects from PRK can include dry eyes and glaring halos at night. Occasionally patients can develop some haze, which may give you some halos in the short term right after surgery, but often with some steroid drops this will go away with seeing a local Ophthalmologist .

Overall the success rate associated with PRK is very high. If you have any questions about PRK, you should talk to your local optometrist or refractive surgeon, who will be more than happy to answer your questions. Now health Network

Presenter: Dr. Baseer Khan, Ophthalmologist, Vaughan, ON

Healthy eyes depend on regular visits to your optometrist for eye exams, and if necessary, an ophthalmologist for certain eye conditions and surgeries like diabetic retinopathy . You can also protect your eyesight with proper nutrition, eating foods that contain the right vitamins.

Local Optometrists may prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses, provide laser eye surgery consultations, and test for diseases.  Local Ophthalmologist  can help with many facts of eye diseases. Getting a referral from your optometrist to a local ophthalmologist is crucial to eye care.

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